Entries in Animals (54)

Wednesday
Nov232011

TOMORROW’S PLANET: How science is finding a new way to preserve animal species

Tomorrow's Planet

Within the next 50 years it is predicted that at least 30% of all land, fresh-water and marine animals will become extinct. The threat of animal extinction has inspired the Frozen Ark, a project working to save the genetic material of our most endangered creatures.

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Wednesday
Nov092011

Deadly Animals: The World's Most Dangerous Places

This week has been all about deadly animals around the world, so today we thought we should take a look at the world's most dangerous and deadly regions where you might just find yourself face-to-face with some of these creatures.

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Tuesday
Nov082011

Frontier Myth Buster: What (not) to do when Deadly Animals Attack

Yesterday we looked at the world’s most deadly animals. Today, we’ll be dispelling a few myths surrounding these frightening creatures and what to do if one attacks: Should I really be sucking the venom from this snake bite? Will a well-aimed punch to the nose really save me from this shark attack?

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Monday
Nov072011

Frontier Focus: World’s Deadliest Animals

This week we have an exciting line-up for you on Into the Wild. Building up to a fascinating two-part interview with everyone’s favourite snake-wrangler, Austin Stevens, we thought we would get you in the mood with a week focusing on the planet’s most dangerous and deadly animals.

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Friday
Sep302011

Wildlife Photography – Kit Advice

Whilst achieving striking and effective wildlife photography is by no means utterly dependent on using quality equipment, it certainly doesn’t hurt your chances. So here is Frontier’s kit guide to the making your life as a budding wildlife photographer run that little bit more smoothly.

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Monday
Sep262011

A Week of Wildlife Photography

This week’s blog theme is wildlife photography. For many, including several of us here at Frontier HQ, becoming a wildlife photographer would be a dream job. Anything that incorporates travel and wildlife is right up our street. So we thought we’d dedicate a week to this beautiful and inspirational art-form.

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Monday
Sep052011

5 Projects that will bring you close to Amazing Wildlife

Frontier has wildlife conservation projects all over the world. Despite the vast variety of locations and species on offer, all of the projects share in common the chance to bring you close to some incredible wildlife. Today we look at some of our most popular projects, as well as considering a few of the lesser-known opportunities available.

Australia - Wallaby Resuce

This project will see you working closely with both adult and baby wallabies injured by human activity. Taking you to the spectacular outback of Queensland in the north-east of Australia, this is a hugely rewarding and important project to get involved in. Baby wallabies are frequently left orphaned when older animals are killed for meat or injured in road traffic incidents. Your daily interaction with these vulnerable animals will see you build some strong bonds during your stay.

Madagascar – Marine Conservation & Diving
Learn to dive in some of the most beautiful and unexplored marine habitats on the planet. Your time in this amazing marine habitat will be shared with an extraordinary array of resident wildlife such as rays, reef fish, sea urchins, anemones, octopus and sea turtles. But this is only the beginning; dolphins, sharks and migrating whales are just a few of the larger animals lurking in the deeper waters. Madagascar is renowned for its unique wildlife, with 80% of species endemic to the island. You will be conducting vital research and surveys around these important ecosystems in order to establish future conservation efforts.

Costa Rica – Big Cats, Primates and Turtles
Costa Rica is home to the highest density of species anywhere in the world. You will be staying in the very heart of this unparalleled paradise exploring and documenting all it has to offer. Your base will be the camp on the shore of the pacific coast, from which you will set out on daily trips to survey the country’s wildlife, much of which is critically endangered. With the chance to witness such varied and rare species, such as the elusive jaguar, this project is a popular choice and will appeal to those with a real sense of adventure.  

China – Panda Breeding
An iconic species in an astonishing country; little wonder that this project is in such high demand. Offering the chance to play a part in the conservation of a truly remarkable species, the China panda breeding centre is an experience you will never forget. You will learn first-hand about what it takes to run a successful panda breeding programme. Duties will include feeding the pandas as well as the possibility of recording valuable data on the behaviour of these rare animals.
 
Italy – Dolphin Monitoring & Sailing
You don’t have to travel to the other side of the world to get a Frontier experience. The dolphin monitoring & sailing project in Italy offers an amazing opportunity much closer to home than you might have expected. Based on the island of Ischia off the coast of Naples, you will be sailing everyday to aid scientists in their research into all aspects of dolphin behaviour. All the training you need will be given to you once you arrive, although sea sickness might be a personal challenge to conquer.

Above are 5 excellent examples of how a Frontier project could bring you into contact with some of the world’s most mesmerising and endangered wildlife on the planet. See what else is on offer on the Frontier Website.

Wednesday
Aug242011

Great migrations of the animal kingdom: part two

Continuing this week’s theme of amazing animal migrations, today it is the turn of those winged wonders that cover some incredible distances year in, year out. Migration is often associated with flight, and it is no surprise when you consider that birds hold some of the most incredible records when it comes to annual voyages around the world.

Arctic Tern Between Greenland and Antarctica

Currently the record holder of the longest migration of any creature on the planet, this tiny bird has been found to travel distances up to 44,000 miles ever year in its journey between Greenland and Antarctica. Previously too small to be recorded accurately, this illustrious title was thought to belong to the Sooty Shearwater, which is not far behind with a recorded migration of about 40,000 miles. The Arctic Tern can live for up to 30 years, meaning that over its lifetime an individual probably travels a total of about 1.5 million miles, equivalent to three trips to the moon and back. A truly out of this world, head-terning traveller.

Monarch ButterflyBetween Canada/USA to Central Mexico

Not all migrations by air are those of birds: the journey of the Monarch butterfly is one of the most amazing and interesting occurrences in the natural world. A normal Monarch butterfly only lives for between 4-5 weeks. However, once a year, a special Methuselah generation of individuals is born. This individual is remarkably able to live for up to eight months, the equivalent of a human living to the age of 525. The reason for this unbelievable phenomenon is the need to migrate. This special generation must fly between 1,200-2,800 miles south from their breeding grounds in Canada and the USA, to Central Mexico, to avoid the harsh winter. Guided by the sun’s orbit, the butterflies have been known to cover distances of up to 80 miles per day, an amazing feat for such a small creature.

The arrival of the butterflies in the forests between the states of Mexico and Michoacan is a true natural wonder. Here they hibernate from mid-November to mid-February, when they begin the journey back. However, the Methuselah generation cannot make the return journey on its own, eventually dying on the way. In another incredible twist to the journey, a succession of normal generations take over the flight, gradually making their way north. The individuals that return to the original breeding grounds have never been there themselves, with a sense of orientation thought to be passed on genetically from the great, great grandparents that first set out on the migratory trip. Wow. 

By Alex Prior

Friday
Jul292011

Human Impact: Dying for a souvenir; Can trophy hunting ever be justified?  

Monday
Jul252011

Human Impact on the Animal World

Friday
Jul152011

The evolution of the wildlife documentary: part two

Following on from Wednesday’s look back at the early days of natural history television, today we're going to take a look at the state of wildlife documentaries in recent years.

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Wednesday
Jul132011

The evolution of the wildlife documentary: part one

This week Frontier takes a look at the ongoing relationship between wildlife and film. In this feature, we explore the history of the wildlife documentary from its humble beginnings in the late 19th century through to the big-budget offerings we see on our screens today.

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