Thursday
Apr172014

Epic Beach Clean April 2014 

Frontier Madagascar - Assemble! Together come the marine and forest teams to form a throng of Frontier blue to attack the beach and forest between the local villages of Antafondro and Ambalahonko. Along the beach they scurried, through the forest they squirreled away picking up over 10 50kg bags of rubbish of all kinds which makes a huge difference the local area and the communities that live here whilst also spreading the impact and awareness of Frontier in the field. Strong work!

Leaving on time: important! & Team Australia - strong beach cleaners.

Never a dull moment on this hunt for rubbish with keen eyed Lisa Bennett noting down all debris whilst preparation key for these two.

Never leaving home without your medical kit is essential here!

Like bees around a honey pot - this litter didn't stand a chance.

Time for a well earned drink!

 

An amazing effort by the team and a huge sum of rubbish collected which has helped the local area enormously.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr172014

Busy busy busy!

You know how some people dread Mondays and don't like coming off the weekend and into their day to day job? Well, we Mondays! Especially on the Terrestrial Research Programme where they had an epic day of surveying, lectures, tests and revision all lined up. STRONG. Next... cooking on camp is a bit like an audition for Masterchef. There are many tough judges, ingredients are not necessarily cohesive to produce a 'normal' dish and the conditions can be brutal over wood fire. However, ARO Lisa DOMINATED dinner with a cumin inspired beautiful red bean paradise. What a hero! And...she's through to the next round.

#LL7 & Batman and Robin?! Sadly no, it is just our Project Manager Chris and Terrestrial Assistant Research Officer Noel 'bonding' out the back of camp.

Training, training, training = Important, important, important. Here the marine team are receiving a lecture from intrepid ARO Lisa on their benthic species which is incredibly useful to enabling them to learn the different species and improve their general knowledge. Strong work! & Another week and another finished BTEC. This time it is the turn of formidable marine volunteer Ben to present his findings on his studies of anemone and the relationship with skunk and Madagascar fish, and what a great job he did as well. Strong work!

Our Terrestrial Research Principal Investigator has been referred to as many things - bold, brave, beautiful etc etc. However, yesterday the only words coming from our volunteers and staff members during the birds test are not repeatable in this pleasant company, such is her insatiable desire for 100% in all tests. Marvellous work! & Education of the local communities is vital to the improvement of their knowledge of the environment. Equally, however, is the impact we can make on our own staff and volunteers by encouraging them to learn about where all their rubbish and debris can end up. Motivational posters such as this are found across camp to encourage understanding and learning and are very well received!

Those crazy kids down on camp Frontier Madagascar are up to their usual tricks again - this time transforming an otherwise grey and boring metal hut wall into a beautiful mint green facade which is to become 'The Frontier Madagascar Ten Commandments', aimed at teaching the team classic Malagasy phrases to improve their language skills and community engagement. Excellent! Here's the First Commandment of our Malagasy Phrases! & Our WOW (words of wisdom) wall continues to go from strength to strength. Our recent post from outgoing Beach Conservation volunteer summed her up perfectly indicating how much she liked a party (and helping preserve the local mangroves - naturally).

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Wednesday
Apr162014

Volunteer blog: Tristan Dewick

Chytridiomycosis otherwise known as chytrid fungus is one of the biggest threats facing amphibian species and populations around the world. Chytridiomycosis is a disease caused by the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis which little is known about the impacts to the host individual. Much research has determined that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis disrupts the individual’s osmoregulation or respiration across the skin of the individual it infects. The pathogen then releases toxins into the host which is detrimental to the individual’s health and can cause the death.

Chytrid fungus has been expected to be the cause of the decline of frog species and populations in the rainforests of Australia and Panama and has also been associated with the decline of frog populations in Ecuador, Venezuela, New Zealand and Spain. Madagascar rates 12th highest in the world with the most amphibian species richness. This figure is expected to increase as an additional 182 species have been identified since. 220 species of frogs found in Madagascar have been assessed by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) 9 of which have been listed as critically endangered, 21 as endangered and 25 as vulnerable. These figures make for 25% of the species found in Madagascar as threatened which is much higher than the per country average of 12%. Of these species present in Madagascar 100% of the autochthonous species and 88% of the genera are endemic to Madagascar and the surrounding islands.

Historically, extinction of frog species in Madagascar have not been detected with many of the species present being discovered in the last 15 years. Over 500 frog specimens from around 80 species found in many different environments around Madagascar, have been tested for chytrid fungus and while the majority have tested negative, 3 species have indeed tested positive to the disease. These species include Heterixalus alboguttatus, Heterixalus betsileo, and Scaphiophryne spinosa. These positive tested species suggest that chytrid fungus could become well established in Madagascar, causing severe ecological consequences which may be irreparable. 

The discovery of chytrid fungus is very bad news as more and more stress is being applied to frog populations via habitat destruction, a changing climate as well international pet trade. Habitat destruction is believed to have already led to the removal of 90% of the original vegetation which has caused a major threat to a number of species present. Warming trends in Madagascar are expected to remain equal or increase compared to the world average causing more issues to frog species due to endemic species being restricted to a narrower home range. The international pet trade is becoming more and more popular which is applying more stress on particular frog species and communities across the country.

To address the conservation of frog species in Madagascar, in 2003 the president Marc Ravalomanana, announced an action plan to put into place. This action plan lead to the doubling of protected areas, allowing the opportunity to exist for the proposal of new protected areas as well as triggering more international awareness about the importance of the frog species present in Madagascar. These actions are very helpful to the conservation of frog species as it allows larger areas to be monitored frequently for any outbreaks of chytrid fungus. By creating more international awareness it may cause for more travellers to be conscious about travelling and spreading the infection. The spread of chytrid fungus can occur due to inadequate cleaning of boots and other items of clothing which may have come in to contact with the disease. Ensuring that items such as these have been cleaned will limit the areas where chytrid fungus can establish.

To ensure chytrid fungus does not impact other species and populations of frogs in Madagascar, surveillance and rapid responses to additional introduction events need to be prolific and efficient. Madagascar is an amphibian hot spot and may be the only one left which hasn’t been impacted significantly by the disease. We must ensure that this remains and the eradication of chytrid fungus is successful to allow future generations of people to experience the incredible frog biodiversity Madagascar has to offer.

By Tristan Dewick, Forest volunteer

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Apr152014

Principal Investigator Blog: Mega Map Puffer

This Thursday staff and the new volunteers were incredibly lucky to encounter an enormous adult Map Puffer (Acothron mappa) resting on the seabed at our dive site with the greatest fish diversity, Nosy Left. So far the dive had been going okay, the visibility wasn't exceptional like usual and there was a strong current coming from the east of the island which we had to swim against whilst finishing our Baseline Survey Protocol transect.

As we finished the survey and reeled the line in we all gave up swimming against the current and left it drift us back towards the boat was. As we did, marine Assistant Research Officer Lisa spotted   a beast down by the sea floor. Absolutely stunned by the size of the animal it took everyone a couple of seconds to register what it was.

Puffers are from the family Tetraontidae, relatives to porcupinefish, tobys and boxfish. Remarkably, these iconic fish of tropical seas are severely under-researched and there are few academic papers documenting their ecology, conservation status and biology.

The map puffer is a large solitary demersel fish (associated with the sea floor) reaching up to 65cm total length. It's range extends the tropical and subtropical coastal waters from the Western Indian Ocean to the western Pacific. Most typically it is found close to reef drop-offs and sheltered lagoons. Interestingly all of our reefs here in the Nosy Vorona Bight are shallow (max depth of 9m on the high tide at some sites) lacking a drop-off and although this is the largest individual anyone from Frontier Madagascar has encountered, they are relatively frequent visitors of our study area.

Unlike other teleosts (bony fish), the map puffer lacks scales. Other unusual features of puffer fish morphology are that they lack a pelvic fin and lateral line. The lateral line system in teleost fish and chondrichythans (sharks, skates, rays and chimeras) is used in mechanoreception – the ability to detect vibrations within the water column of prey or predators. Not only do puffers lack a pelvic fin, the dorsal and anal fins are small, symmetric and located at the end of the body. The swimming abilities of all Tetraondid fish is the way that they manoeuvre their fins, and highly comical to observe. Often described as “evolutionary rejects”, tetradondids have the most amusing locomotory system of any fish, often swimming around in circles and seemingly struggling to maintain a good sense of direction. 

Puffers generate thrust by use of their pectoral fins in addition to their dorsal and anal fins with their mouth titled upwards when going into a current or for any rapid movements. Whilst more relaxed swimming the pectoral fins undulate and move out of phase from one another while the dorsal and anal fins oscillate in phase with each other. It is not uncommon to watch them putting significant energy into the position of their dorsal fin to in an attempt to stabilise their position and direction in the water, and is particularly interesting to watch when they are moving very slowly.

Encountering a pufferfish on a dive is an extremely exciting experience, but what more interesting this time was the enormous size of this map puffer. Although we could not accurately measure the specimen, it was a full adult certainly close to the current maximum recorded size of puffers at 65cm TL. Not only was the body long, but the girth (width) was enormous. All staff and volunteers considered themselves extremely lucky, as to see an animal of this size is a rare phenomenon owing to the ubiquity of fishing activity throughout all the world’s coastal waters. Although puffers have toxic properties harmful to the point of fatal to humans to consume, they are regularly caught as bycatch in coastal artisanal and commercial fisheries.

Not only is it a pleasure for us to enjoy watching the clumsy, uncoordinated movements of fish from the family Tetradondidae but their abundance on our reefs is encouraging. Representatives of Puffers and Porcupine fish are one of the key grazers of the biological pest and outbreak echinoid Diadema setosum, commonly referred to as the Spiny Sea Urchin. These invertebrates are responsible for intensive coral erosion, exacerbated by the removal of their predators from fishing. We regularly sight these on snorkels and dives which can only mean good things for our reefs.

By Emma Dobinson, Marine Principal Investigator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Apr152014

Camp life continues

Hang on - what's this? Lights in our RA Hut Sharon?! Shock horror. Frontier Madagascar is always moving with the times and providing light in the dark. Whatever next?!

Look how glorious our new Laundry Bidans sign is! It is the little things which make the difference after all, including the detail on the bubbles. Marvellous.

On camp Frontier Madagascar, we understand the value of good food. Hence, each Sunday we have a communal dinner and this week's winning dish was Zebu, Pork and Merguez Sausage Hot Dogs with fresh baguettes, caramelised onions and chips. Not too shabby. Sausage chef Noel loves his job!

Look who it is! Only new Research Assistant Annie all the way from the wild depths of Australia. Seen here with our Terrestrial Research Principal Investigator, she was 'stoked' to be on camp and has already been heard having the following conversation with our other Australian campers:
"G'day, cobber."
"G'day, mate. How're ye doin'?"
"Aw, been flat out like a lizard drinkin'. Hear the Sydney Swans hammered Collingwood on Saturday?"
"Ripper."

 

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Apr142014

Congratulations!

Amazing news for our old Terrestrial Research Principal Investigator and Assistant Research Officer who have had a paper published recently in Herpetology Notes on their first recording of the chameleon Furcifer petteri here in Nosy Be. Strong work!

http://www.herpetologynotes.seh-herpetology.org/contents7.html

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Apr142014

An exciting week

Frontier Madagascar Life Lessons continue with more being added to the wall with growing speed! Although... Bad news: Research Assistant Matthew Markham left us today after ten weeks on the Adventurer programme. Good news: He wrote on our Words of Wisdom Wall! Amazing.

What did you do on your day off this week? Frontier Madagascar went to a picture perfect 1.2km white sand bank which is only cross-able at low tide, which is also amazing for Scuba Diving and an important breeding site for Hawksbill Turtles. It is OK to be jealous...

BTEC Presentation from Research Assistant Brad who completed his study here on 'The Abundance of E. mathaei and the predators of E. mathaei'. Strong work! Our intrepid volunteer Brad is finishing up his CoPE qualification and as part of this he is expected to lead a discussion on an area of interest in the group. The debate on the role and point of captive animals centres proved quite lively!

BREAKING NEWS: 'Breadmond' has brought back the love for breakfast with fresh, hot bread now the order of the day for this camp's petit dejeuner. So long sabeda, it was good but this is so much better. Strong work team and Chef Edmond - what a hero!

Volunteer of the Week and winner of the Honourary Alfred Hill volunteer of the week award: Alice Parry. Winning for outstanding beach conservationist tekkers, a strong grasp of her bird identification already and a great assistance around camp and coping with her bag going missing for four days. Strong work!

Another group of new volunteers can only mean another bonding moment for the group with volunteers and staff randomly selected to be bound to another via industrial strength masking tape. A ferocious battle was had but there was only ever going to be one winning pair who could make it until morning!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Apr142014

Forest friends

Busy day in the Forest...

MGF found 17 Brookesia stumpffi on their active search in Site 1 primary forest last night setting a new Frontier Madagascar record. Strong work!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Friday
Apr112014

Marine team

The team love a group photo on the boat. Look how pretty they all are! Marvellous stuff.

Epic marine surveying photo of our Dive Officer Leo demonstrating perfect buoyancy to perform a key aspect of our baseline survey protocol. Strong work!

Dive Officer Leo Clarkson likes it out here. This photo was also taken on his birthday, which is lovely! Great day in the office. Assistant Research Officer Lisa Bennett and Research Assistant Ben Dalton cruise along our transect to quantify the different facets of coral reef community health.

Research Assistant Ben Dalton smashed his territorial fish scientific training and is now our territorial surveyor. Look at those fish counting skills.

We are extremely fortunate to be in Northwest Madagascar. In 2007 this part of the country revealed to have the greatest scleractinian coral (reef building) diversity! High diversity is widely accepted to increase an ecosystems resilience to natural and anthropogenic disturbance.

Where have all the fish gone? Overexploitation of fisheries is a global problem and the situation is the same for Madagascar. An impoverished country, they have sold many of their fishing rights to Asian and European countries.

Fortunately, we our located within the easterly flowing current that passes Nosy Tanikely Marine Protected Area. Such close proximity means that are reefs are benefited by biomass spillover of adult fish and larval replenishment from fish within the MPA. There has been a recent baby boom where each day we are lucky to see juvenile reef fish taking refuge between the branches of long and short branching corals. Here we can see some young Blue Damsels aggregating above the coral head.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Research Assistant Ben Dalton smashed his territorial fish scientific training and is now our territorial surveyor. Look at those fish counting skills.
Thursday
Apr102014

Life Lessons

And so it begins...the Frontier Madagascar Life Lessons Wall is underway.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr102014

Mixed Prints Party

Nothing mixed about the fun had at this party. Mixed prints = pure joy

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr102014

Beach clean!

Another monster beach clean by the Frontier Madagascar team collecting another huge sack of rubbish including the ever favourite plastic bags, shoes, diapers and general debris. Excellent work team!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr102014

Camp life

Amphibian surveys are key to the work that we do here and who better to give a lecture on this than our Assistant Research Officer and frog lover Noel! Strong work! Branded Frontier dive cylinders. Outstanding!

First rule of Frontier Madagascar: Be Better. Our new Life Lessons wall is coming along beautifully. Frontier Madagascar is also supremely dedicated to physical fitness. Here you can see two of our terrestrial research team pushing their bodies to their limits.

It is a new month which means it is a new deployment. Hello new volunteers! Also, as we are such a health and safety focused organisation we have them learning about the mild dangers of the Malagasy world on their first day. Strong work! Next knowledge learning for the PADI Open Water courses is intensive stuff. Thankfully the Project Manager plies the Dive Officer with Fig Rolls to maintain high morale and the students sail through their learning activities.

Fire making in Madagascar is an essential tool for cooking and boiling water. Here this is demonstrated with great panache by our Terrestrial Research Assistant Research Officer Richard. Marine Volunteer Ben and Dive Officer Leo often tend to be found bonding over their love for carrying our boat engine. What a lovely couple they make!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Apr082014

Volunteer blog: Nell Cambell

Garry remembers the fateful day his parents died in a freak car accident on a family vacation in Hellville. He was an only lizard and so he was left all alone in the strange, bustling city to fend for himself. After many weeks of aimless wandering around town being shunned by the local reptile community, Garry jumps on banana boat headed for an unknown town up the coast. Upon arrival on the mysterious Ambalahonko beach, a gang of Phelsuma laticaudas come hustling up towards him. ‘What are you doing on our turf, boy? You don’t belong here’ said the one with a re-growing tail. ‘I’m new here’, quivered Garry. ‘I was hoping to find more of my kind’. ‘Well you ain’t one of us, kid. Get out of here’.

Garry begins to trudge along the beach in the opposite direction. After feeling lonely for so long in Hellville, Garry’s dream of finding friends in this new village was beginning to die right before his eyes. Suddenly, as he wipes a tear from his eye, Garry spies a lonely Phelsuma madagascariensis on the trunk of a coconut tree. ‘Hey!’ he yells. ‘You up there, do you want to be my friend?’ The madagascariensis slowly turns towards him. ‘Listen, you seem like a nice guy but I’m sorry, we can’t be friends’ says the lizard as he scrambles up the trunk. Garry feels more alone than ever as he looks further into the forest. ‘Will I ever feel at home?’ he asks.

It’s at that moment that Garry witnesses something he’s never seen before – a young ape-like animal wearing an amazingly bright blue t-shirt picking up rubbish among the leaf-litter. ‘Who are you?’ he asks. When he hears no reply he decides to follow the strange man into the forest and see if he cannot find a friend along the way. After 20 minutes of James Bond-like espionage Garry stumbles into the middle of a camp. He watches the man take off his shoes and lie down in a colourful piece of hanging fabric he later finds out to be a hammock. The next minute, 5 more people in blue shirts come into the camp and start removing their shoes. Scared, Garry climbs up onto the table and up a post. ‘Hey, look at that!’ one of them says. ‘How cute! Let’s keep him forever!’ ‘Friends?’ Garry says, crying the tears of a very happy lizard. And he’s never felt lonely since.

Love, Nell Campbell

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Apr082014

Marine PI Blog: Predator prey relationships 

Predator prey relationships on tropical coral reefs are well documented from empirical evidence and observed changes in trophic relationships within these complex ecosystems. Whilst research efforts have focused on iconic and charismatic shark species, studies of the feeding ethology of teleost (bony) fish are scarce and few fully cover the mechanisms used to capture and process prey.

Sling-Jaw wrasse

Thus far three broad methods of prey capture by reef fish have been identified; suction, ram and manipulation feeding. The feeding method employed by reef fishes in many cases may reflect the fish’s role within the trophic web. Suction and ram highlight speed and motion whilst manipulation reflects power within a biting action.

Suction feeding alone is considered the most primitive feeding mechanism of reef teleosts. Fish will rapidly expand the buccal cavity (this includes their mouth, pharynx and gills) and creates a pressure gradient between this space and the area around the head. Although considered primitive, to some degree it is the most common method of prey capture, especially amongst predators of mobile animal prey.

So why do higher trophic predators seemingly exhibit the most primitive form of prey capture? Suction feeding is usually used by predators to compliment the effects of ram feeding. Ram feeding is where a predator will rapidly move their body forward overtaking the prey and capturing them in protruded jaws. Two extreme examples coral reef examples are manta rays and whale sharks. These iconic marine megafauna capture prey in an open outs while they swim through dense swarms of planktonic prey. Ram feeding can be distinguished from suction feeding base on the relative role of forward mouth movement (ram) and water flow towards the mouth (suction). It also may be accomplished by forward motion of the entire body or separately by protrusion of the jaws, termed "jaw-ram" feeding and is typical of many zooplanktivores who move their mouth quickly towards prey before using a burst of suction to draw the prey into the buccal cavity. One iconic reef fish famed for this mechanism is the Sling-Jaw wrasse (Epibulus insidiator) which possesses the most protractible jaw known in teleost fish.

Ram feeders face an additional challenge in having to eliminate what is referred to as a bow wave that may be formed if they are forcing an open mouth through the water. The solution for most predators in this instance is to use considerable ram (e.g. Barracuda, groupers) to overtake prey with body movements and finish the attack with an explosive strike of suction feeding, known as "compensatory suction". This compensatory suction is use to eliminates the difficulties of prey capture induced by them bow wave.

For these two different feeding modalities to occur singularly is extremely rare and instead are both used by most coral reef predators.

Manipulation is the last identified method of reef fish feign ethology currently distinguished. The jaws will be directly applied to the prey and used to remove it from the substratum. This mode occurs less frequently than ram and suction feeding but occurs throughout most reef herbivores from the Parrotfish, Surgeonfish and bennies.

It is typical for people to associate the large protruding grasping teeth with a paowerful bite force to seize prey; especially in fishes such as Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) however this is deceptive. The form and function of teeth differ significantly and are related to the feeding ethology. Large predatory teleosts have large grasping teeth, not to inflict harm on their prey, but to act as a friction device, preventing captured prey from escaping back out of the mouth after ram or suction feeding.

The teeth of manipulators often reflect the method used by fish to extract prey from the substrate. In some taxa such as wrasses the teeth are relatively large and recurved, though not sharp as seen in piscivores and are used for gripping relatively large invertebrate prey from within the reef. Herbivorous manipulators show variation from the beak like jaws of the Parrotfish (family: Scaridae) to single rows of complex crowned teeth as seen in surgeonfish (Acanthuridae).

By Emma Dobinson, Marine Principal Investigator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Apr072014

A lovely bunch

Volunteer of the Week and winner of the Honourary Alfred Hill Volunteer of the Week Award: Ben Dalton. Winning for his all round general good egg-ness and marine brilliance. Strong work! & Staff member of the Month and winner of some bacon and a pain viennoise goes to Leo Clarkson, our in house Dive Officer, for being an underwater general and receiving excellent feedback on his training courses. Strong work!

Wow! Our stunning Forest PI, Emily White, enjoying a refreshing dip by a waterfall, after a long, hard, sweaty trek through the primary forest. Work hard, play hard! After seeing this picture, we may consider developing and marketing our own brand of shampoo. Meanwhile both the terrestrial staff love their Frontier branded t-shirts!

MGF Intern Tristan temporarily overcame his fear of snakes to pose for this epic selfie with a beautiful tree boa, Sanzinia madagascariensis voluntary.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Apr072014

Eulemur macaco

A beautiful male Black lemur (Eulemur macaco) surveys his territory on Nosy Komba during the recent Forest team's trip there. Tourists who come to the island regularly feed the lemurs here, so they are fairly habituated. One of our current AROs is looking into the effects this has on lemur behaviour, in comparison with those on Nosy Be, where our camp is located. Fascinating stuff!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Friday
Apr042014

Forest Intern blog: Tristan Derwick

The satellite camp in Nosy Komba was an excellent time had and one I will not forget any time soon. Upon arriving to Nosy Komba and seeing the mountain which we had to conquer, everyone was slightly terrified. I have never sweated so much in my life! While walking, I was constantly thinking about how I would like to be fitter, and then at my sweatiest whilst taking a short break I saw a Madagascar Pygmy Kingfisher, a bird I had been hoping to see for the entire time I have been here. The appearance of this single bird improved my mood so much that I actually enjoyed the rest of the walk up to the monastery where we were staying!

Despite Nosy Komba almost ruining me in only the first hour (the hill made the rest of the week seem easy though!), it also made me realise how much fun it is to take selfies with reptiles! Whilst on the trip, I managed to get two amazing selfies, one with a Uroplatus henkeli and the other with a Brookesia stumpffi. As I write these two photos are terrorising the cyber world with all the love they are attracting from around the world!

Aside from the Pygmy Kingfisher, selfies and amazing abundance of reptiles, the best thing about sat camp was Edmond. Not only did he manage the incredible feat of walking everywhere in crocs, despite it being muddy and steep in places, he also has a fashion sense like no other! His best outfit by far was the ‘party pants under shorts, accompanied by sleeveless shirt’ look, of course made complete by his crocs!  I had a fantastic week on sat camp and will definitely not forget the trip for a very long time.

By Tristan Derwick, forest intern

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr032014

Lovely lizards

A lovely Zonosaurus rufipes (red-legged girdled lizard) showing off his red ventral undercarriage. The lady lizards can't get enough!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Apr032014

Beach clean!

Another week, another beach clean here at Frontier Madagascar. Our intrepid team of mariners have combed the local shores and found all numbers of miscellaneous refuse which supports the local communities and their environments. In collaboration with our environmental awareness workshops we intend to make a major difference to the way people in developing nations consider disposing of their waste. Strong work!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

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